knees wax
knees wax
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masterofthemountain:

Yoshitaka Amano.
+
malformalady:

A cat’s tongue has special features called “papillae”. The papillae are small hair-like growths that point towards the back of the mouth. These slightly hooked growths are very strong because they are made of keratin, the same component you can find in human fingernails. The papillae are not only used for self-grooming, but also holding food and hunting. Along with strong jaws, the papillae help felines hold their prey tight. In the wild, these miniature teeth help lick the meat off a bone so there are no leftovers. Moreover, there is a special papillae type at the tip of the tongue and along its sides. These papillae have large taste buds. Thanks to them, cats have a keener sense of taste than dogs.
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asylum-art:


JAZ HAROLD: Soft sculptures

on Facebook
Jaz Harold is a New York based fine artist. Her recent works are soft and inviting, rich with plush fabrics, yarns, and pastel hues. Sexual undertones (and overtones) and themes of self reflection or inner dialogue are incorporated throughout her oeuvre. Using an aesthetic that consciously appeals to child-like naïveté, Jaz’s work softens the emphasis on the ego, ritual, intimacy, and stigma that society generally attaches to sex. Cherry blossoms (sakura) are a perfect balance of sexual innuendo, beauty, and innocence. The cherry blossom, symbolizing love in many cultures, adds an additional element in a body of work that covers both areas- an innocent love, and a simple uninhibited lust.
asylum-art:


JAZ HAROLD: Soft sculptures

on Facebook
Jaz Harold is a New York based fine artist. Her recent works are soft and inviting, rich with plush fabrics, yarns, and pastel hues. Sexual undertones (and overtones) and themes of self reflection or inner dialogue are incorporated throughout her oeuvre. Using an aesthetic that consciously appeals to child-like naïveté, Jaz’s work softens the emphasis on the ego, ritual, intimacy, and stigma that society generally attaches to sex. Cherry blossoms (sakura) are a perfect balance of sexual innuendo, beauty, and innocence. The cherry blossom, symbolizing love in many cultures, adds an additional element in a body of work that covers both areas- an innocent love, and a simple uninhibited lust.
asylum-art:


JAZ HAROLD: Soft sculptures

on Facebook
Jaz Harold is a New York based fine artist. Her recent works are soft and inviting, rich with plush fabrics, yarns, and pastel hues. Sexual undertones (and overtones) and themes of self reflection or inner dialogue are incorporated throughout her oeuvre. Using an aesthetic that consciously appeals to child-like naïveté, Jaz’s work softens the emphasis on the ego, ritual, intimacy, and stigma that society generally attaches to sex. Cherry blossoms (sakura) are a perfect balance of sexual innuendo, beauty, and innocence. The cherry blossom, symbolizing love in many cultures, adds an additional element in a body of work that covers both areas- an innocent love, and a simple uninhibited lust.
asylum-art:


JAZ HAROLD: Soft sculptures

on Facebook
Jaz Harold is a New York based fine artist. Her recent works are soft and inviting, rich with plush fabrics, yarns, and pastel hues. Sexual undertones (and overtones) and themes of self reflection or inner dialogue are incorporated throughout her oeuvre. Using an aesthetic that consciously appeals to child-like naïveté, Jaz’s work softens the emphasis on the ego, ritual, intimacy, and stigma that society generally attaches to sex. Cherry blossoms (sakura) are a perfect balance of sexual innuendo, beauty, and innocence. The cherry blossom, symbolizing love in many cultures, adds an additional element in a body of work that covers both areas- an innocent love, and a simple uninhibited lust.
asylum-art:


JAZ HAROLD: Soft sculptures

on Facebook
Jaz Harold is a New York based fine artist. Her recent works are soft and inviting, rich with plush fabrics, yarns, and pastel hues. Sexual undertones (and overtones) and themes of self reflection or inner dialogue are incorporated throughout her oeuvre. Using an aesthetic that consciously appeals to child-like naïveté, Jaz’s work softens the emphasis on the ego, ritual, intimacy, and stigma that society generally attaches to sex. Cherry blossoms (sakura) are a perfect balance of sexual innuendo, beauty, and innocence. The cherry blossom, symbolizing love in many cultures, adds an additional element in a body of work that covers both areas- an innocent love, and a simple uninhibited lust.
asylum-art:


JAZ HAROLD: Soft sculptures

on Facebook
Jaz Harold is a New York based fine artist. Her recent works are soft and inviting, rich with plush fabrics, yarns, and pastel hues. Sexual undertones (and overtones) and themes of self reflection or inner dialogue are incorporated throughout her oeuvre. Using an aesthetic that consciously appeals to child-like naïveté, Jaz’s work softens the emphasis on the ego, ritual, intimacy, and stigma that society generally attaches to sex. Cherry blossoms (sakura) are a perfect balance of sexual innuendo, beauty, and innocence. The cherry blossom, symbolizing love in many cultures, adds an additional element in a body of work that covers both areas- an innocent love, and a simple uninhibited lust.
asylum-art:


JAZ HAROLD: Soft sculptures

on Facebook
Jaz Harold is a New York based fine artist. Her recent works are soft and inviting, rich with plush fabrics, yarns, and pastel hues. Sexual undertones (and overtones) and themes of self reflection or inner dialogue are incorporated throughout her oeuvre. Using an aesthetic that consciously appeals to child-like naïveté, Jaz’s work softens the emphasis on the ego, ritual, intimacy, and stigma that society generally attaches to sex. Cherry blossoms (sakura) are a perfect balance of sexual innuendo, beauty, and innocence. The cherry blossom, symbolizing love in many cultures, adds an additional element in a body of work that covers both areas- an innocent love, and a simple uninhibited lust.
asylum-art:


JAZ HAROLD: Soft sculptures

on Facebook
Jaz Harold is a New York based fine artist. Her recent works are soft and inviting, rich with plush fabrics, yarns, and pastel hues. Sexual undertones (and overtones) and themes of self reflection or inner dialogue are incorporated throughout her oeuvre. Using an aesthetic that consciously appeals to child-like naïveté, Jaz’s work softens the emphasis on the ego, ritual, intimacy, and stigma that society generally attaches to sex. Cherry blossoms (sakura) are a perfect balance of sexual innuendo, beauty, and innocence. The cherry blossom, symbolizing love in many cultures, adds an additional element in a body of work that covers both areas- an innocent love, and a simple uninhibited lust.
asylum-art:


JAZ HAROLD: Soft sculptures

on Facebook
Jaz Harold is a New York based fine artist. Her recent works are soft and inviting, rich with plush fabrics, yarns, and pastel hues. Sexual undertones (and overtones) and themes of self reflection or inner dialogue are incorporated throughout her oeuvre. Using an aesthetic that consciously appeals to child-like naïveté, Jaz’s work softens the emphasis on the ego, ritual, intimacy, and stigma that society generally attaches to sex. Cherry blossoms (sakura) are a perfect balance of sexual innuendo, beauty, and innocence. The cherry blossom, symbolizing love in many cultures, adds an additional element in a body of work that covers both areas- an innocent love, and a simple uninhibited lust.
asylum-art:


JAZ HAROLD: Soft sculptures

on Facebook
Jaz Harold is a New York based fine artist. Her recent works are soft and inviting, rich with plush fabrics, yarns, and pastel hues. Sexual undertones (and overtones) and themes of self reflection or inner dialogue are incorporated throughout her oeuvre. Using an aesthetic that consciously appeals to child-like naïveté, Jaz’s work softens the emphasis on the ego, ritual, intimacy, and stigma that society generally attaches to sex. Cherry blossoms (sakura) are a perfect balance of sexual innuendo, beauty, and innocence. The cherry blossom, symbolizing love in many cultures, adds an additional element in a body of work that covers both areas- an innocent love, and a simple uninhibited lust.
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Mara.  Hawk #moth
Mara.  Hawk #moth
Mara.  Hawk #moth
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asylum-art:

Timothy Hon Hung Lee
Tim Lee’s large-scale ink drawings and paintings on rice paper are, at a first glance, tightly bound with the visual aesthetics of Chinese painting, while simultaneously referencing elements of traditional European art. The conflation of these visual cultures is unsurprising: Lee is a British artist of Chinese descent.
But the work does not just amount to a reverential homage to these past cultures. The construction of this work is a slow meditation on composition, where the artist enacts an exploration of the pictorial space (and a very physical one: at certain points moving back from the work, assessing it under altered light conditions, even making “passes” of the hand over the paper, feeling, in a literal sense, his way through the construction of the image). The works do not grow from background to foreground as in traditional painting, and are not planned as an overall image, but are in a sense unveiled through a nomadic meandering across the paper, where entire sections are completed before stepping back and deciding which direction to take next. This lack of a dominating, pre-established composition can explain why these paintings often operate best when the eye is allowed to roam slowly across the surface.
asylum-art:

Timothy Hon Hung Lee
Tim Lee’s large-scale ink drawings and paintings on rice paper are, at a first glance, tightly bound with the visual aesthetics of Chinese painting, while simultaneously referencing elements of traditional European art. The conflation of these visual cultures is unsurprising: Lee is a British artist of Chinese descent.
But the work does not just amount to a reverential homage to these past cultures. The construction of this work is a slow meditation on composition, where the artist enacts an exploration of the pictorial space (and a very physical one: at certain points moving back from the work, assessing it under altered light conditions, even making “passes” of the hand over the paper, feeling, in a literal sense, his way through the construction of the image). The works do not grow from background to foreground as in traditional painting, and are not planned as an overall image, but are in a sense unveiled through a nomadic meandering across the paper, where entire sections are completed before stepping back and deciding which direction to take next. This lack of a dominating, pre-established composition can explain why these paintings often operate best when the eye is allowed to roam slowly across the surface.
asylum-art:

Timothy Hon Hung Lee
Tim Lee’s large-scale ink drawings and paintings on rice paper are, at a first glance, tightly bound with the visual aesthetics of Chinese painting, while simultaneously referencing elements of traditional European art. The conflation of these visual cultures is unsurprising: Lee is a British artist of Chinese descent.
But the work does not just amount to a reverential homage to these past cultures. The construction of this work is a slow meditation on composition, where the artist enacts an exploration of the pictorial space (and a very physical one: at certain points moving back from the work, assessing it under altered light conditions, even making “passes” of the hand over the paper, feeling, in a literal sense, his way through the construction of the image). The works do not grow from background to foreground as in traditional painting, and are not planned as an overall image, but are in a sense unveiled through a nomadic meandering across the paper, where entire sections are completed before stepping back and deciding which direction to take next. This lack of a dominating, pre-established composition can explain why these paintings often operate best when the eye is allowed to roam slowly across the surface.
asylum-art:

Timothy Hon Hung Lee
Tim Lee’s large-scale ink drawings and paintings on rice paper are, at a first glance, tightly bound with the visual aesthetics of Chinese painting, while simultaneously referencing elements of traditional European art. The conflation of these visual cultures is unsurprising: Lee is a British artist of Chinese descent.
But the work does not just amount to a reverential homage to these past cultures. The construction of this work is a slow meditation on composition, where the artist enacts an exploration of the pictorial space (and a very physical one: at certain points moving back from the work, assessing it under altered light conditions, even making “passes” of the hand over the paper, feeling, in a literal sense, his way through the construction of the image). The works do not grow from background to foreground as in traditional painting, and are not planned as an overall image, but are in a sense unveiled through a nomadic meandering across the paper, where entire sections are completed before stepping back and deciding which direction to take next. This lack of a dominating, pre-established composition can explain why these paintings often operate best when the eye is allowed to roam slowly across the surface.
asylum-art:

Timothy Hon Hung Lee
Tim Lee’s large-scale ink drawings and paintings on rice paper are, at a first glance, tightly bound with the visual aesthetics of Chinese painting, while simultaneously referencing elements of traditional European art. The conflation of these visual cultures is unsurprising: Lee is a British artist of Chinese descent.
But the work does not just amount to a reverential homage to these past cultures. The construction of this work is a slow meditation on composition, where the artist enacts an exploration of the pictorial space (and a very physical one: at certain points moving back from the work, assessing it under altered light conditions, even making “passes” of the hand over the paper, feeling, in a literal sense, his way through the construction of the image). The works do not grow from background to foreground as in traditional painting, and are not planned as an overall image, but are in a sense unveiled through a nomadic meandering across the paper, where entire sections are completed before stepping back and deciding which direction to take next. This lack of a dominating, pre-established composition can explain why these paintings often operate best when the eye is allowed to roam slowly across the surface.
asylum-art:

Timothy Hon Hung Lee
Tim Lee’s large-scale ink drawings and paintings on rice paper are, at a first glance, tightly bound with the visual aesthetics of Chinese painting, while simultaneously referencing elements of traditional European art. The conflation of these visual cultures is unsurprising: Lee is a British artist of Chinese descent.
But the work does not just amount to a reverential homage to these past cultures. The construction of this work is a slow meditation on composition, where the artist enacts an exploration of the pictorial space (and a very physical one: at certain points moving back from the work, assessing it under altered light conditions, even making “passes” of the hand over the paper, feeling, in a literal sense, his way through the construction of the image). The works do not grow from background to foreground as in traditional painting, and are not planned as an overall image, but are in a sense unveiled through a nomadic meandering across the paper, where entire sections are completed before stepping back and deciding which direction to take next. This lack of a dominating, pre-established composition can explain why these paintings often operate best when the eye is allowed to roam slowly across the surface.
asylum-art:

Timothy Hon Hung Lee
Tim Lee’s large-scale ink drawings and paintings on rice paper are, at a first glance, tightly bound with the visual aesthetics of Chinese painting, while simultaneously referencing elements of traditional European art. The conflation of these visual cultures is unsurprising: Lee is a British artist of Chinese descent.
But the work does not just amount to a reverential homage to these past cultures. The construction of this work is a slow meditation on composition, where the artist enacts an exploration of the pictorial space (and a very physical one: at certain points moving back from the work, assessing it under altered light conditions, even making “passes” of the hand over the paper, feeling, in a literal sense, his way through the construction of the image). The works do not grow from background to foreground as in traditional painting, and are not planned as an overall image, but are in a sense unveiled through a nomadic meandering across the paper, where entire sections are completed before stepping back and deciding which direction to take next. This lack of a dominating, pre-established composition can explain why these paintings often operate best when the eye is allowed to roam slowly across the surface.
asylum-art:

Timothy Hon Hung Lee
Tim Lee’s large-scale ink drawings and paintings on rice paper are, at a first glance, tightly bound with the visual aesthetics of Chinese painting, while simultaneously referencing elements of traditional European art. The conflation of these visual cultures is unsurprising: Lee is a British artist of Chinese descent.
But the work does not just amount to a reverential homage to these past cultures. The construction of this work is a slow meditation on composition, where the artist enacts an exploration of the pictorial space (and a very physical one: at certain points moving back from the work, assessing it under altered light conditions, even making “passes” of the hand over the paper, feeling, in a literal sense, his way through the construction of the image). The works do not grow from background to foreground as in traditional painting, and are not planned as an overall image, but are in a sense unveiled through a nomadic meandering across the paper, where entire sections are completed before stepping back and deciding which direction to take next. This lack of a dominating, pre-established composition can explain why these paintings often operate best when the eye is allowed to roam slowly across the surface.
+
asylum-art:

Art, Science, & Soap Bubbles, According to Santiago Betancur Z 
Photographer and painter Santiago Betancur Z explores the intersection between science and abstract art in his photographic studies of bubbles, as well as producing life-size figure painting. In his photographs and video recordings, Betancur Z captures imagery of soap bubbles against dark backgrounds, showcasing the random kaleidoscopic color and light effects produced by the delicate spheres, and the chance allusions that occur in their surfaces, such as in Scream (2013), whose ghostly forms recall Edvard Munch’s.
asylum-art:

Art, Science, & Soap Bubbles, According to Santiago Betancur Z 
Photographer and painter Santiago Betancur Z explores the intersection between science and abstract art in his photographic studies of bubbles, as well as producing life-size figure painting. In his photographs and video recordings, Betancur Z captures imagery of soap bubbles against dark backgrounds, showcasing the random kaleidoscopic color and light effects produced by the delicate spheres, and the chance allusions that occur in their surfaces, such as in Scream (2013), whose ghostly forms recall Edvard Munch’s.
asylum-art:

Art, Science, & Soap Bubbles, According to Santiago Betancur Z 
Photographer and painter Santiago Betancur Z explores the intersection between science and abstract art in his photographic studies of bubbles, as well as producing life-size figure painting. In his photographs and video recordings, Betancur Z captures imagery of soap bubbles against dark backgrounds, showcasing the random kaleidoscopic color and light effects produced by the delicate spheres, and the chance allusions that occur in their surfaces, such as in Scream (2013), whose ghostly forms recall Edvard Munch’s.
asylum-art:

Art, Science, & Soap Bubbles, According to Santiago Betancur Z 
Photographer and painter Santiago Betancur Z explores the intersection between science and abstract art in his photographic studies of bubbles, as well as producing life-size figure painting. In his photographs and video recordings, Betancur Z captures imagery of soap bubbles against dark backgrounds, showcasing the random kaleidoscopic color and light effects produced by the delicate spheres, and the chance allusions that occur in their surfaces, such as in Scream (2013), whose ghostly forms recall Edvard Munch’s.
asylum-art:

Art, Science, & Soap Bubbles, According to Santiago Betancur Z 
Photographer and painter Santiago Betancur Z explores the intersection between science and abstract art in his photographic studies of bubbles, as well as producing life-size figure painting. In his photographs and video recordings, Betancur Z captures imagery of soap bubbles against dark backgrounds, showcasing the random kaleidoscopic color and light effects produced by the delicate spheres, and the chance allusions that occur in their surfaces, such as in Scream (2013), whose ghostly forms recall Edvard Munch’s.
asylum-art:

Art, Science, & Soap Bubbles, According to Santiago Betancur Z 
Photographer and painter Santiago Betancur Z explores the intersection between science and abstract art in his photographic studies of bubbles, as well as producing life-size figure painting. In his photographs and video recordings, Betancur Z captures imagery of soap bubbles against dark backgrounds, showcasing the random kaleidoscopic color and light effects produced by the delicate spheres, and the chance allusions that occur in their surfaces, such as in Scream (2013), whose ghostly forms recall Edvard Munch’s.
asylum-art:

Art, Science, & Soap Bubbles, According to Santiago Betancur Z 
Photographer and painter Santiago Betancur Z explores the intersection between science and abstract art in his photographic studies of bubbles, as well as producing life-size figure painting. In his photographs and video recordings, Betancur Z captures imagery of soap bubbles against dark backgrounds, showcasing the random kaleidoscopic color and light effects produced by the delicate spheres, and the chance allusions that occur in their surfaces, such as in Scream (2013), whose ghostly forms recall Edvard Munch’s.
asylum-art:

Art, Science, & Soap Bubbles, According to Santiago Betancur Z 
Photographer and painter Santiago Betancur Z explores the intersection between science and abstract art in his photographic studies of bubbles, as well as producing life-size figure painting. In his photographs and video recordings, Betancur Z captures imagery of soap bubbles against dark backgrounds, showcasing the random kaleidoscopic color and light effects produced by the delicate spheres, and the chance allusions that occur in their surfaces, such as in Scream (2013), whose ghostly forms recall Edvard Munch’s.
asylum-art:

Art, Science, & Soap Bubbles, According to Santiago Betancur Z 
Photographer and painter Santiago Betancur Z explores the intersection between science and abstract art in his photographic studies of bubbles, as well as producing life-size figure painting. In his photographs and video recordings, Betancur Z captures imagery of soap bubbles against dark backgrounds, showcasing the random kaleidoscopic color and light effects produced by the delicate spheres, and the chance allusions that occur in their surfaces, such as in Scream (2013), whose ghostly forms recall Edvard Munch’s.
asylum-art:

Art, Science, & Soap Bubbles, According to Santiago Betancur Z 
Photographer and painter Santiago Betancur Z explores the intersection between science and abstract art in his photographic studies of bubbles, as well as producing life-size figure painting. In his photographs and video recordings, Betancur Z captures imagery of soap bubbles against dark backgrounds, showcasing the random kaleidoscopic color and light effects produced by the delicate spheres, and the chance allusions that occur in their surfaces, such as in Scream (2013), whose ghostly forms recall Edvard Munch’s.
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fotojournalismus:

A Palestinian man photographs a fire in Gaza’s main power plant following an overnight Israeli airstrike south of Gaza City on July 29, 2014. Gaza’s only power plant destroyed in Israel’s most intense air strike yet — at least 100 Palestinians killed and media outlets, mosque and refugee camp all targeted (Oliver Weiken/EPA)
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fotojournalismus:

Day 19: Palestinian death toll passes 1,000 | July 26, 2014
Thousands of Gaza residents who fled the violence streamed back to devastated border areas during Saturday’s 12-hour humanitarian truce to find large-scale destruction: fighting pulverized scores of homes, wreckage blocked roads and power cables dangled in the streets. In northern Beit Hanoun, even the hospital was badly damaged by shelling. Across Gaza, more than 130 bodies were pulled from the rubble on Saturday, officials said. In southern Gaza, 20 members of an extended family were killed before the start of the lull when a tank shell hit a building where they had sought refuge. (Sources: 1, 2, 3)
Pictures from Beit Hanoun & Shejaiyah during a pause in the bombing by Israeli forces:
1. A general view of destruction in the Shejaia neighbourhood. (Mohammed Salem/Reuters)
2. Palestinians carry belongings they find at their destroyed houses in Beit Hanoun. (Sergey Ponomarev for The New York Times)
3. A Palestinian man looks staggered after seeing his home destroyed, while visiting the area during a 12-hour cease-fire in Shejaiyah neighbourhood. (Khalil Hamra/AP)
4. Palestinians inspect the damage of their destroyed houses in Shejaiyah neighbourhood. (Khalil Hamra/AP)
5. Palestinians recover the body of a man killed when his home was hit the previous night by Israeli fire in the northern district of Beit Hanoun. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)
6. A mare and her foal walk along the debris of destroyed buildings in the northern district of Beit Hanoun. (Mohammed Abed/AFP/Getty Images)
7. Palestinians survey the damage in Beit Hanoun. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)
8. Children wait for their parents, who collect belongings from their destroyed houses in Beit Hanoun. (Sergey Ponomarev for The New York Times)
9. A general view of destroyed buildings after Israeli attacks in a part of the Shuja’iyya neighbourhood. (Oliver Weiken/EPA)
10. Palestinian women react amid the destruction in the northern district of Beit Hanoun. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)
(Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)
fotojournalismus:

Day 19: Palestinian death toll passes 1,000 | July 26, 2014
Thousands of Gaza residents who fled the violence streamed back to devastated border areas during Saturday’s 12-hour humanitarian truce to find large-scale destruction: fighting pulverized scores of homes, wreckage blocked roads and power cables dangled in the streets. In northern Beit Hanoun, even the hospital was badly damaged by shelling. Across Gaza, more than 130 bodies were pulled from the rubble on Saturday, officials said. In southern Gaza, 20 members of an extended family were killed before the start of the lull when a tank shell hit a building where they had sought refuge. (Sources: 1, 2, 3)
Pictures from Beit Hanoun & Shejaiyah during a pause in the bombing by Israeli forces:
1. A general view of destruction in the Shejaia neighbourhood. (Mohammed Salem/Reuters)
2. Palestinians carry belongings they find at their destroyed houses in Beit Hanoun. (Sergey Ponomarev for The New York Times)
3. A Palestinian man looks staggered after seeing his home destroyed, while visiting the area during a 12-hour cease-fire in Shejaiyah neighbourhood. (Khalil Hamra/AP)
4. Palestinians inspect the damage of their destroyed houses in Shejaiyah neighbourhood. (Khalil Hamra/AP)
5. Palestinians recover the body of a man killed when his home was hit the previous night by Israeli fire in the northern district of Beit Hanoun. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)
6. A mare and her foal walk along the debris of destroyed buildings in the northern district of Beit Hanoun. (Mohammed Abed/AFP/Getty Images)
7. Palestinians survey the damage in Beit Hanoun. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)
8. Children wait for their parents, who collect belongings from their destroyed houses in Beit Hanoun. (Sergey Ponomarev for The New York Times)
9. A general view of destroyed buildings after Israeli attacks in a part of the Shuja’iyya neighbourhood. (Oliver Weiken/EPA)
10. Palestinian women react amid the destruction in the northern district of Beit Hanoun. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)
(Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)
fotojournalismus:

Day 19: Palestinian death toll passes 1,000 | July 26, 2014
Thousands of Gaza residents who fled the violence streamed back to devastated border areas during Saturday’s 12-hour humanitarian truce to find large-scale destruction: fighting pulverized scores of homes, wreckage blocked roads and power cables dangled in the streets. In northern Beit Hanoun, even the hospital was badly damaged by shelling. Across Gaza, more than 130 bodies were pulled from the rubble on Saturday, officials said. In southern Gaza, 20 members of an extended family were killed before the start of the lull when a tank shell hit a building where they had sought refuge. (Sources: 1, 2, 3)
Pictures from Beit Hanoun & Shejaiyah during a pause in the bombing by Israeli forces:
1. A general view of destruction in the Shejaia neighbourhood. (Mohammed Salem/Reuters)
2. Palestinians carry belongings they find at their destroyed houses in Beit Hanoun. (Sergey Ponomarev for The New York Times)
3. A Palestinian man looks staggered after seeing his home destroyed, while visiting the area during a 12-hour cease-fire in Shejaiyah neighbourhood. (Khalil Hamra/AP)
4. Palestinians inspect the damage of their destroyed houses in Shejaiyah neighbourhood. (Khalil Hamra/AP)
5. Palestinians recover the body of a man killed when his home was hit the previous night by Israeli fire in the northern district of Beit Hanoun. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)
6. A mare and her foal walk along the debris of destroyed buildings in the northern district of Beit Hanoun. (Mohammed Abed/AFP/Getty Images)
7. Palestinians survey the damage in Beit Hanoun. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)
8. Children wait for their parents, who collect belongings from their destroyed houses in Beit Hanoun. (Sergey Ponomarev for The New York Times)
9. A general view of destroyed buildings after Israeli attacks in a part of the Shuja’iyya neighbourhood. (Oliver Weiken/EPA)
10. Palestinian women react amid the destruction in the northern district of Beit Hanoun. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)
(Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)
fotojournalismus:

Day 19: Palestinian death toll passes 1,000 | July 26, 2014
Thousands of Gaza residents who fled the violence streamed back to devastated border areas during Saturday’s 12-hour humanitarian truce to find large-scale destruction: fighting pulverized scores of homes, wreckage blocked roads and power cables dangled in the streets. In northern Beit Hanoun, even the hospital was badly damaged by shelling. Across Gaza, more than 130 bodies were pulled from the rubble on Saturday, officials said. In southern Gaza, 20 members of an extended family were killed before the start of the lull when a tank shell hit a building where they had sought refuge. (Sources: 1, 2, 3)
Pictures from Beit Hanoun & Shejaiyah during a pause in the bombing by Israeli forces:
1. A general view of destruction in the Shejaia neighbourhood. (Mohammed Salem/Reuters)
2. Palestinians carry belongings they find at their destroyed houses in Beit Hanoun. (Sergey Ponomarev for The New York Times)
3. A Palestinian man looks staggered after seeing his home destroyed, while visiting the area during a 12-hour cease-fire in Shejaiyah neighbourhood. (Khalil Hamra/AP)
4. Palestinians inspect the damage of their destroyed houses in Shejaiyah neighbourhood. (Khalil Hamra/AP)
5. Palestinians recover the body of a man killed when his home was hit the previous night by Israeli fire in the northern district of Beit Hanoun. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)
6. A mare and her foal walk along the debris of destroyed buildings in the northern district of Beit Hanoun. (Mohammed Abed/AFP/Getty Images)
7. Palestinians survey the damage in Beit Hanoun. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)
8. Children wait for their parents, who collect belongings from their destroyed houses in Beit Hanoun. (Sergey Ponomarev for The New York Times)
9. A general view of destroyed buildings after Israeli attacks in a part of the Shuja’iyya neighbourhood. (Oliver Weiken/EPA)
10. Palestinian women react amid the destruction in the northern district of Beit Hanoun. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)
(Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)
fotojournalismus:

Day 19: Palestinian death toll passes 1,000 | July 26, 2014
Thousands of Gaza residents who fled the violence streamed back to devastated border areas during Saturday’s 12-hour humanitarian truce to find large-scale destruction: fighting pulverized scores of homes, wreckage blocked roads and power cables dangled in the streets. In northern Beit Hanoun, even the hospital was badly damaged by shelling. Across Gaza, more than 130 bodies were pulled from the rubble on Saturday, officials said. In southern Gaza, 20 members of an extended family were killed before the start of the lull when a tank shell hit a building where they had sought refuge. (Sources: 1, 2, 3)
Pictures from Beit Hanoun & Shejaiyah during a pause in the bombing by Israeli forces:
1. A general view of destruction in the Shejaia neighbourhood. (Mohammed Salem/Reuters)
2. Palestinians carry belongings they find at their destroyed houses in Beit Hanoun. (Sergey Ponomarev for The New York Times)
3. A Palestinian man looks staggered after seeing his home destroyed, while visiting the area during a 12-hour cease-fire in Shejaiyah neighbourhood. (Khalil Hamra/AP)
4. Palestinians inspect the damage of their destroyed houses in Shejaiyah neighbourhood. (Khalil Hamra/AP)
5. Palestinians recover the body of a man killed when his home was hit the previous night by Israeli fire in the northern district of Beit Hanoun. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)
6. A mare and her foal walk along the debris of destroyed buildings in the northern district of Beit Hanoun. (Mohammed Abed/AFP/Getty Images)
7. Palestinians survey the damage in Beit Hanoun. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)
8. Children wait for their parents, who collect belongings from their destroyed houses in Beit Hanoun. (Sergey Ponomarev for The New York Times)
9. A general view of destroyed buildings after Israeli attacks in a part of the Shuja’iyya neighbourhood. (Oliver Weiken/EPA)
10. Palestinian women react amid the destruction in the northern district of Beit Hanoun. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)
(Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)
fotojournalismus:

Day 19: Palestinian death toll passes 1,000 | July 26, 2014
Thousands of Gaza residents who fled the violence streamed back to devastated border areas during Saturday’s 12-hour humanitarian truce to find large-scale destruction: fighting pulverized scores of homes, wreckage blocked roads and power cables dangled in the streets. In northern Beit Hanoun, even the hospital was badly damaged by shelling. Across Gaza, more than 130 bodies were pulled from the rubble on Saturday, officials said. In southern Gaza, 20 members of an extended family were killed before the start of the lull when a tank shell hit a building where they had sought refuge. (Sources: 1, 2, 3)
Pictures from Beit Hanoun & Shejaiyah during a pause in the bombing by Israeli forces:
1. A general view of destruction in the Shejaia neighbourhood. (Mohammed Salem/Reuters)
2. Palestinians carry belongings they find at their destroyed houses in Beit Hanoun. (Sergey Ponomarev for The New York Times)
3. A Palestinian man looks staggered after seeing his home destroyed, while visiting the area during a 12-hour cease-fire in Shejaiyah neighbourhood. (Khalil Hamra/AP)
4. Palestinians inspect the damage of their destroyed houses in Shejaiyah neighbourhood. (Khalil Hamra/AP)
5. Palestinians recover the body of a man killed when his home was hit the previous night by Israeli fire in the northern district of Beit Hanoun. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)
6. A mare and her foal walk along the debris of destroyed buildings in the northern district of Beit Hanoun. (Mohammed Abed/AFP/Getty Images)
7. Palestinians survey the damage in Beit Hanoun. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)
8. Children wait for their parents, who collect belongings from their destroyed houses in Beit Hanoun. (Sergey Ponomarev for The New York Times)
9. A general view of destroyed buildings after Israeli attacks in a part of the Shuja’iyya neighbourhood. (Oliver Weiken/EPA)
10. Palestinian women react amid the destruction in the northern district of Beit Hanoun. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)
(Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)
fotojournalismus:

Day 19: Palestinian death toll passes 1,000 | July 26, 2014
Thousands of Gaza residents who fled the violence streamed back to devastated border areas during Saturday’s 12-hour humanitarian truce to find large-scale destruction: fighting pulverized scores of homes, wreckage blocked roads and power cables dangled in the streets. In northern Beit Hanoun, even the hospital was badly damaged by shelling. Across Gaza, more than 130 bodies were pulled from the rubble on Saturday, officials said. In southern Gaza, 20 members of an extended family were killed before the start of the lull when a tank shell hit a building where they had sought refuge. (Sources: 1, 2, 3)
Pictures from Beit Hanoun & Shejaiyah during a pause in the bombing by Israeli forces:
1. A general view of destruction in the Shejaia neighbourhood. (Mohammed Salem/Reuters)
2. Palestinians carry belongings they find at their destroyed houses in Beit Hanoun. (Sergey Ponomarev for The New York Times)
3. A Palestinian man looks staggered after seeing his home destroyed, while visiting the area during a 12-hour cease-fire in Shejaiyah neighbourhood. (Khalil Hamra/AP)
4. Palestinians inspect the damage of their destroyed houses in Shejaiyah neighbourhood. (Khalil Hamra/AP)
5. Palestinians recover the body of a man killed when his home was hit the previous night by Israeli fire in the northern district of Beit Hanoun. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)
6. A mare and her foal walk along the debris of destroyed buildings in the northern district of Beit Hanoun. (Mohammed Abed/AFP/Getty Images)
7. Palestinians survey the damage in Beit Hanoun. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)
8. Children wait for their parents, who collect belongings from their destroyed houses in Beit Hanoun. (Sergey Ponomarev for The New York Times)
9. A general view of destroyed buildings after Israeli attacks in a part of the Shuja’iyya neighbourhood. (Oliver Weiken/EPA)
10. Palestinian women react amid the destruction in the northern district of Beit Hanoun. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)
(Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)
fotojournalismus:

Day 19: Palestinian death toll passes 1,000 | July 26, 2014
Thousands of Gaza residents who fled the violence streamed back to devastated border areas during Saturday’s 12-hour humanitarian truce to find large-scale destruction: fighting pulverized scores of homes, wreckage blocked roads and power cables dangled in the streets. In northern Beit Hanoun, even the hospital was badly damaged by shelling. Across Gaza, more than 130 bodies were pulled from the rubble on Saturday, officials said. In southern Gaza, 20 members of an extended family were killed before the start of the lull when a tank shell hit a building where they had sought refuge. (Sources: 1, 2, 3)
Pictures from Beit Hanoun & Shejaiyah during a pause in the bombing by Israeli forces:
1. A general view of destruction in the Shejaia neighbourhood. (Mohammed Salem/Reuters)
2. Palestinians carry belongings they find at their destroyed houses in Beit Hanoun. (Sergey Ponomarev for The New York Times)
3. A Palestinian man looks staggered after seeing his home destroyed, while visiting the area during a 12-hour cease-fire in Shejaiyah neighbourhood. (Khalil Hamra/AP)
4. Palestinians inspect the damage of their destroyed houses in Shejaiyah neighbourhood. (Khalil Hamra/AP)
5. Palestinians recover the body of a man killed when his home was hit the previous night by Israeli fire in the northern district of Beit Hanoun. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)
6. A mare and her foal walk along the debris of destroyed buildings in the northern district of Beit Hanoun. (Mohammed Abed/AFP/Getty Images)
7. Palestinians survey the damage in Beit Hanoun. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)
8. Children wait for their parents, who collect belongings from their destroyed houses in Beit Hanoun. (Sergey Ponomarev for The New York Times)
9. A general view of destroyed buildings after Israeli attacks in a part of the Shuja’iyya neighbourhood. (Oliver Weiken/EPA)
10. Palestinian women react amid the destruction in the northern district of Beit Hanoun. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)
(Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)
fotojournalismus:

Day 19: Palestinian death toll passes 1,000 | July 26, 2014
Thousands of Gaza residents who fled the violence streamed back to devastated border areas during Saturday’s 12-hour humanitarian truce to find large-scale destruction: fighting pulverized scores of homes, wreckage blocked roads and power cables dangled in the streets. In northern Beit Hanoun, even the hospital was badly damaged by shelling. Across Gaza, more than 130 bodies were pulled from the rubble on Saturday, officials said. In southern Gaza, 20 members of an extended family were killed before the start of the lull when a tank shell hit a building where they had sought refuge. (Sources: 1, 2, 3)
Pictures from Beit Hanoun & Shejaiyah during a pause in the bombing by Israeli forces:
1. A general view of destruction in the Shejaia neighbourhood. (Mohammed Salem/Reuters)
2. Palestinians carry belongings they find at their destroyed houses in Beit Hanoun. (Sergey Ponomarev for The New York Times)
3. A Palestinian man looks staggered after seeing his home destroyed, while visiting the area during a 12-hour cease-fire in Shejaiyah neighbourhood. (Khalil Hamra/AP)
4. Palestinians inspect the damage of their destroyed houses in Shejaiyah neighbourhood. (Khalil Hamra/AP)
5. Palestinians recover the body of a man killed when his home was hit the previous night by Israeli fire in the northern district of Beit Hanoun. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)
6. A mare and her foal walk along the debris of destroyed buildings in the northern district of Beit Hanoun. (Mohammed Abed/AFP/Getty Images)
7. Palestinians survey the damage in Beit Hanoun. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)
8. Children wait for their parents, who collect belongings from their destroyed houses in Beit Hanoun. (Sergey Ponomarev for The New York Times)
9. A general view of destroyed buildings after Israeli attacks in a part of the Shuja’iyya neighbourhood. (Oliver Weiken/EPA)
10. Palestinian women react amid the destruction in the northern district of Beit Hanoun. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)
(Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)
fotojournalismus:

Day 19: Palestinian death toll passes 1,000 | July 26, 2014
Thousands of Gaza residents who fled the violence streamed back to devastated border areas during Saturday’s 12-hour humanitarian truce to find large-scale destruction: fighting pulverized scores of homes, wreckage blocked roads and power cables dangled in the streets. In northern Beit Hanoun, even the hospital was badly damaged by shelling. Across Gaza, more than 130 bodies were pulled from the rubble on Saturday, officials said. In southern Gaza, 20 members of an extended family were killed before the start of the lull when a tank shell hit a building where they had sought refuge. (Sources: 1, 2, 3)
Pictures from Beit Hanoun & Shejaiyah during a pause in the bombing by Israeli forces:
1. A general view of destruction in the Shejaia neighbourhood. (Mohammed Salem/Reuters)
2. Palestinians carry belongings they find at their destroyed houses in Beit Hanoun. (Sergey Ponomarev for The New York Times)
3. A Palestinian man looks staggered after seeing his home destroyed, while visiting the area during a 12-hour cease-fire in Shejaiyah neighbourhood. (Khalil Hamra/AP)
4. Palestinians inspect the damage of their destroyed houses in Shejaiyah neighbourhood. (Khalil Hamra/AP)
5. Palestinians recover the body of a man killed when his home was hit the previous night by Israeli fire in the northern district of Beit Hanoun. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)
6. A mare and her foal walk along the debris of destroyed buildings in the northern district of Beit Hanoun. (Mohammed Abed/AFP/Getty Images)
7. Palestinians survey the damage in Beit Hanoun. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)
8. Children wait for their parents, who collect belongings from their destroyed houses in Beit Hanoun. (Sergey Ponomarev for The New York Times)
9. A general view of destroyed buildings after Israeli attacks in a part of the Shuja’iyya neighbourhood. (Oliver Weiken/EPA)
10. Palestinian women react amid the destruction in the northern district of Beit Hanoun. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)
(Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)
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anapraxis:

Anza Borrego.